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Architecture

  • De Wereld op Zuid. Bouwen aan een brede school
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    v

    De Wereld op Zuid. Bouwen aan een brede school

    +++ +++

    +++Theo Kupers, Eleonoor Jap Sam, Jannes Linders [eds]+++

    ISBN

    978-94-90322-04-5

    Graphic designer

    Ben Laloua / Didier Pascal i.s.m. Marius Hofstede

    Number of pages

    188

    Book size

    15 x 20

    Binding

    Paperback

    Only available in Dutch

    Date of release: September 2009

    +++

    Publication about the community school De Wereld op Zuid in Rotterdam. The building of the school is designed by N2 Architekten.

    With text contributions by Dolf Broekhuizen, Eleonoor Jap Sam, Anne van der Kooi, Jaap Koole, Theo Kupers, Philip Kuypers, Flemming de Moll, Maarten Van Den Driessche, Bart Verschaffel and photographs made by Jannes Linders.

    €24.50

  • Dispersion
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    Dispersion

    €12.50

    v

    Dispersion

    +++A Study of Global Mobility and the Dynamics of a Fictional Urbanism+++

    +++Diego Barajas+++

    ISBN

    978-90-5973-002-X

    Graphic designer

    Joost Grootens

    Number of pages

    160

    Book size

    21 x 15

    Binding

    Hardcover

    Available in English

    special offer: now only € 12.50 instead of € 19,50 [the Netherlands] € 22,50 [Europe] € 24,50 [outside Europa]

    +++

    This publication is based on a thesis that studies global mobility and territories in dispersion; a research about problematics of the public space in the context of globalization and territories altered by multiple migration processes.

    Based in Rotterdam, Diego Barajas concentrates his research on the urban dispersals shaped by migration, looking first at the Cape Verdean Diaspora and its territorial structure, and then focused on the case of the 'belhuis'.
    This project was developed at the Berlage Institute under the guidance of Bart Lootsma in 2001-2002.

     

    Diego Barajas (Colombia, 1975) graduated with Honors Degree in architecture from the Universidad de los Andes in 1999 in Bogotá. He has worked in urban design projects in Bogotá for the local government´s Public Space Program, and in urban research and design projects in Rotterdam. Studies at the Berlage Institute, and in 2002 obtains his Master´s degree under the supervision of Bart Lootsma. His work has appeared in several publications and exhibitions, and in particular at the Witte de With (Centre for Contemporary Art) in Rotterdam, at the Rotterdam Historisch Museum where is part of the permanent collection, in PhotoEspaña 2005, the Panorama Emergente for the 4th Architecture Iberoamerican Biennale in Lima, Peru and Fundación Tapies in Barcelona. Barajas has taught in workshops and studios in places such as the Rotterdam Academy of Architecture, The Tamanian Museum in Yerevan or the Universidad Europea de Madrid. He has participated in several discussion panels such as Archilab 2004 in Orleans or Europan 9 in Germany on public space and migration. Currently develops his PhD at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.

    €12.50

  • DIY KLARENSTRAAT
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    DIY KLARENSTRAAT

    €25.00

    v

    DIY KLARENSTRAAT

    +++Zelfbouw en de herontdekking van de portiekflat / A new perspective on the post-war social housing block+++

    +++Edited by Patricia van Ulzen, Antoin Buissink and Rufus de Vries+++

    ISBN

    978-94-90322-66-3

    Graphic designer

    Antoin Buissink

    Number of pages

    224

    Book size

    17 x 24 cm

    Binding

    Softcover

    Dutch / English 

    Date of release: July 2017

    Made possible with the support of Creative Industries Fund NL, the Van Eesteren-Fluck & Van Lohuizen Stichting, and gemeente Amsterdam, stadsdeel Nieuw West, Provincie Noord-Holland, Urbannerdam, Vanschagen Architects, Coffeemania.

    The project 'Klussen op de Klarenstraat' is winner of the Amsterdam Architectuurprijs 2015 (Gouden A.A.P. 2015,) Beste vier ARC14 Award, Nominatie Zuiderkerkprijs 2014

    On the Shortlist of the DAM ARCHITECTURAL BOOK AWARD 2017.

    +++

    The Staalmanplein neighbourhood in Cornelis van Eesteren's Westelijke Tuinsteden (Western Garden Cities) in Amsterdam, has been undergoing a radical regeneration operation since 2008. Whereas most housing blocks in this neighbourhood from the 1950s were demolished and replaced by new buildings, the social housing block in the U.J. Klarenstraat was selected for an experiment: in 2012 the whole block was put up for sale as Do It Yourself apartments.

    The apartment building from 1956 at the U.J. Klarenstraat has been drastically transformed by a group of buyers into a residential building with a highly varied programme. Vanschagen Architects advised the thirty buyers in the development of the project, its design and its realisation.

    This experiment can be considered a success. Reviews in professional journals and the local press were positive, the project was nominated for three awards of which it won one, the residents are satisfied with their self-designed apartments, and the housing corporation perceives beneficial social effects of the project on the neighbourhood.

    With contributions by

    Vincent van Rossem, Patricia van Ulzen, Rufus de Vries (photography), Arjan Gooijer, Sander Gelinck, Maaike Schravesande, Frans van Hulten

    Book launch July 20, 2017, 19.30 hrs, Pakhuis De Zwijger, >>>>>

     

     

    €25.00

  • Douala in Translation. A view of the city and its creative transforming potentials
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    Douala in Translation. A view of the city and its creative transforming potentials

    +++ +++

    +++Lucia Babina, Marilyn Douala Bell [eds]+++

    ISBN

    978-90-5973-071-7 [episode]

    Graphic designer

    Louis Luthi

    Number of pages

    256

    Book size

    18 x 13

    Binding

    Paperback

    This publication has been made possible with the financial support of the Mondriaan Foundation, the Prince Claus Fund and Fondazione lettera27/WikiAfrica

    Awarded 'Best Dutch Book Design 2007'

    Only available in English

    +++

    Douala, the economic and cultural capital of Cameroon, is one of the most important cities in Central Africa. Informal settlements, micro-economies and spontaneous use of the public space have a primary role in the formation of its urban identity.

    This fast growing city is the context in which doual'art, a research centre of urban practices, has been operating for more than 16 years. Since 1991 the co-founders, Marilyn Douala Bell and Didier Schaub have fostered cultural projects and commissioned site-specific art interventions, using art and culture to develop collective processes of urban change.

    This publication brings together cross-disciplinary analyses of Douala that seek to go beyond predictable and prejudicial views about African towns. Douala becomes a thrilling case study in which artistic practices engage and affect the cityscape.

    With contributions by

    Lucia Babina, Edgar Cleijne, Marilyn Douala Bell, Emiliano Gandolfi, Christian Hanussek, Salifou Lindou, Dominique Malaquais, Lionel Manga, Nsame Mbongo, Zayd Minty, Giulia Paoletti, Iolanda Pensa, Didier Schaub, AbdouMaliq Simone, Kamiel Verschuren, Alexander Vollebregt, Silvia Viganò and Hervé Yamguen.

    €24.50

  • Emotional Architecture #4 - Calin Dan
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    Emotional Architecture #4 - Calin Dan

    +++ +++

    +++Calin Dan, Judith Angel, Adela Marcu+++

    ISBN

    978-94-90322-39-7

    Graphic designer

    Arnold Estefán

    Number of pages

    128

    Book size

    15 x 21 cm

    Binding

    Paperback

    Date of release: December 2013

    Translations: Alistair Ian Blyth

    Published with financial support from the Mondriaan Fund.

    +++

    Over the past few years the Romanian-Dutch artist and theorist Calin Dan (1955) has identified a very specific field of research, defined as 'Emotional Architecture', while developing a highly personal idiom where video and photography, next to text and music, play an important role. Dan focuses on the use, the experience, the meaning and the emotional value of architecture and urban environments. Through his observations of the city, his explorations of neighborhoods, his contacts with dwellers and visitors, and through his research of traditions, Calin Dan developed an almost psychoanalytical way of looking at things. His work is an original blend of personal observations, folklore, historical facts and architectural analysis.

    The subject of Emotional Architecture 4 is the MinVROM building in The Hague. It is not only a strong architectural and urban landmark; but it is also a turning point in the way public architecture articulates with political representation in the Netherlands. MinVROM was the last project directly and purposefully commissioned by a government body to an architect's office, according to a vision stemming from ideological, political and representational values. From there on, economic arguments helped the decision to give up the idea of the government (or government bodies) as client and beneficiary of a pre-designed vision, and to substitute it with a relation landlord-tenant, where government institutions will let building units developed independently, by teams of architects, developers and urbanists.  Such a decision has deep impact on the relationship between the political and the social bodies, as the first withdraws from the public domain into a neutral, almost image-less position, comparable to the one of the corporations migrating from station to station, according to momentous priorities.

    €17.50

  • Every Day until Antwerp | Alle dagen tot aan Antwerpen
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    Every Day until Antwerp | Alle dagen tot aan Antwerpen

    +++A Walking Trip along the Railway Line | Een voetreis langs the treinspoor+++

    +++Jacqueline Schoemaker+++

    ISBN

    978-94-92852-25-0

    Graphic designer

    Paul Gangloff

    Number of pages

    160

    Book size

    11 x 17.6 cm

    Binding

    Paperback

    English| Dutch

    Release date: October 2020

    Fonts text: Pirelli Regular, Jung-Lee Type Foundry. Fonts page numbers: Vaguely Specified Objects, a dingbat font assembling Dutch and Belgian railroad signs, Our Polite Society.

    For more information: www.jacqueline-schoemaker.nl

    +++

    Every Day until Antwerp is a literary travel journey about a walking trip from Amsterdam to Antwerp, along the railway line of the old Benelux train that by now has ceased to be. Determined not to go home at the end of a day’s walking but to camp on the land that up till then she had only known as an image seen through the train window, Jacqueline Schoemaker set off, pulling a tent and a sleeping bag in a shopping trolley behind her. She walked in this way from the city where she lives to the city where she grew up.

    Against a background of geographical, commercial and political borders (The River Hollands Diep/the fence round a campsite/the national border), the informal, personal use of space of the traveller becomes more and more perceptible: What is it like to traverse the territory of Schiphol Airport on foot? Or to have a wash in the bushes along the motorway? Every Day until Antwerp is an exercise in appropriating (public) space, an exercise which, through discomfort and confrontation, ultimately leads to a sense of autonomy.

    Jacqueline Schoemaker is a researcher and writer. Her earlier publications include The Undivided City (2012) and Het failliet van de Javastraat (2017).

     

    €15.00

  • Exurbia
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    Exurbia

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    v

    Exurbia

    +++Wonen buiten de stad+++

    +++Harry den Hartog [ed.]+++

    ISBN

    978-90-5973-048-9 [episode]

    Graphic designer

    Ben Laloua / Didier Pascal

    Number of pages

    257

    Book size

    22 x 15

    Binding

    Paperback

    Only available in Dutch

    special offer: now only € 12.50 instead of € 22,50 

    +++

    €12.50

  • Footprint 17 Vol 9/2 The 'Bread & Butter'of Architecture
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    Footprint 17 Vol 9/2 The 'Bread & Butter'of Architecture

    +++Investigating Everyday Practices+++

    +++Nelson Mota, Ricardo Agarez [eds.]+++

    ISBN

    978-94-90322-61-8

    Graphic designer

    Meagen Kerr

    Number of pages

    184

    Book size

    19 x 25.7 cm

    Binding

    Paperback

    English

    Copy editor: Heleen Schröder

    Release date: Autumn/Winter 2015

    Published in cooperation with Architecture Theory Chair (TU Delft) and Stichting Footprint: http://footprint.tudelft.nl/

    For a subscription: Bruil & Van de Staaij

    +++

    The canon of western contemporary architecture has overlooked everyday, 'salaried' architecture – overwhelming as it may have turned out to be in our built environment – praising instead the solo designer and his ground-breaking work. 

     Since World War I, the social role of the architect (in terms both of his or her place in social hierarchies and of his or her contribution for social betterment) seems to have been primarily tested, and largely consolidated, in 'departmental architecture'. Yet the work of county, city and ministerial architects, heads of department in welfare commissions, guilds and cooperatives, is seldom discussed as such: its specificity as the product of institutional initiatives and agents, as the outcome of negotiation between individual and collective agendas, remains little explored, even when authors celebrate the many public-designed projects that are part of the canon. On the other hand, commercially driven architecture and the business side of the profession are still anathema for many, despite being essential factors in the discipline's position in society.

    Footprint 17 addresses the architectural production of those who played their part in inconspicuous offices and unexciting departments, and that contribute insights to discuss the place of the architecture of 'bread & butter' in architectural history studies and in the politics of architectural design and theory. 

    This issue of Footprint explores intellectual frameworks, didactic practices, research methods and analytical instruments that project the disciplinary focus further than the work of the 'prime mover', discussing the relevance of 'salaried' architects and institutional agency in shaping the spatial and social practices of the everyday. 

    With text contributions by: Ricardo Agarez, Nelson Mota (editors), Nick Beech, Amir Djalali, Andri Gerber, Ellen Rowley, Tim Gough, Elizabeth Keslacy.  A visual essay by João Paulo Martins, Sofia Diniz. And review articles by Karen Lisa Burns, Justine Clark, Jullie Willis; Tahl Kaminer; Javier Arpa.

    Footprint is an academic journal dedicated to publishing architecture and urban research. Architecture and urbanism are the points of departure and the core interests of the journal. From this perspective, the journal encourages the study of architecture and the urban environment as a means of comprehending culture and society, and as a tool for relating them to shifting ideological doctrines and philosophical ideas. The journal promotes the creation and development – or revision - of conceptual frameworks and methods of inquiry. It is engaged in creating a body of critical and reflexive texts with a breadth and depth of thought which would enrich the architecture discipline and produce new knowledge, conceptual methodologies and original understandings.

    €25.00

  • Footprint 18 Vol 10/1 Constellation of Awakening: Benjamin and Architecture
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    Footprint 18 Vol 10/1 Constellation of Awakening: Benjamin and Architecture

    +++ +++

    +++Patrick Healy, Andrej Radman [eds.]+++

    ISBN

    978-94-90322-64-9

    Graphic designer

    Meagan Kerr

    Number of pages

    144

    Book size

    19 x 25.7 cm

    Binding

    paperback

    Release date: Spring/Summer 2016

    English

    Copy editor: Heleen Schröder

    Published in cooperation with Architecture Theory Chair (TU Delft) and Stichting Footprint: http://footprint.tudelft.nl/ 

    For a subscription: Bruil & Van de Staaij 

    +++
    With contributions by

    Patrick Healy, Andrej Radman (introduction), Stefan Koller, Lutz Robbers, Jolien Paeleman, Frances Hsu, Ross Lipton, Sarah K. Stanley, Rodrigo Rieiro Díaz, Stéphane Symons, Stephen Michael Witherford    

    In Das Passagen-Werk Benjamin cites a letter from Marx to Ruge, 'the reform of consciousness consists solely in [...] the awakening of the world from its dream about itself.' This idea of awakening recurs in Benjamin's methodological considerations and his many metaphors during the final thirteen years of his life. Benjamin set himself the pedagogical task of awakening 'the image-making medium within us, raising it to a stereoscopic and dimensional seeing into the depths of historical shadows.' His ambition was to develop the art of citing without quotation marks, a concept intimately related to that of montage.

    The importance of architectural theory for Benjamin is most evident in his last work. From his writings on Berlin childhood, his essay on Moscow and Naples, Benjamin's interest in urban topography can be seen to develop into a full analysis of the city, by developing a method which he refers to as physiognomic and in which, inspired by contemporary surrealist practise, the method of montage becomes critical for his showing how the 'now of recognition' in the image opens the historical to awareness, and constitutes the reality of history. He cites Giedion and sees his own work as engaged in a similar task: 'just as Giedion teaches us to read off the basic features of today's architecture in the buildings erected around 1850,' Benjamin writes, 'we in turn would recognise today's forms, in the life and in the apparently secondary lost forms of that epoch.' 

    It was a matter of immediate concern for Benjamin to examine the secondary, the excluded. By a displacement of the angle of vision a positive element would emerge, something different from that previously signified. History is in the nuance, the dialectical contrast as revealed in Benjamin's Parisian studies of the expressive character of the earliest industrial architecture, machines, department stores and advertisements. Nevertheless, as is clear from his note of the comment from Max Raphael's Proudhon, Marx, Picasso, Benjamin reproaches Marx for not having advanced along this way in the full measure of the possibilities of historical materialism.

    Footprint 18 investigates the following issues: what Benjamin understands by the 'constellation of awakening', how he conceptualises 'dialectical images', his deployment of montage, his refusal of a conception of either progress or decline, and his undertaking to show that the images belong not only to a particular time but attain legibility only at a particular time. Famously, according to Benjamin, image is that wherein what has been comes together in a flash with the now to form a constellation. With regard to the architectural theory Benjamin engaged directly with the tectonic tradition, especially the work of Bötticher. He posited the tectonic unconscious and the deployment of optical instruments as crucial for understanding the development which architecture carried from the luxus capitalist forms of commodity. In light of technical innovations in iron and glass, it expressed a form of projective dream work of the architectural around material realisations as products of the industrial revolution, with long consequences for the future. 

    Footprint is an academic journal dedicated to publishing architecture and urban research. Architecture and urbanism are the points of departure and the core interests of the journal. From this perspective, the journal encourages the study of architecture and the urban environment as a means of comprehending culture and society, and as a tool for relating them to shifting ideological doctrines and philosophical ideas. The journal promotes the creation and development – or revision - of conceptual frameworks and methods of inquiry. It is engaged in creating a body of critical and reflexive texts with a breadth and depth of thought which would enrich the architecture discipline and produce new knowledge, conceptual methodologies and original understandings.

    €25.00

  • Footprint 19 Spaces of Conflict
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    v

    Footprint 19 Spaces of Conflict

    +++Vol 10/2 2016+++

    +++Malkit Shoshan, Marc Schoonderbeek [eds.]+++

    ISBN
    978-94-90322-72-4

    Pages

    170

    Design

    Meagen Kerr

    Size

    19 x 25.7 cm

    Binding

    Softcover

    English

    Date of release: Winter 2016 

    Published in cooperation with Architecture Theory Chair (TU Delft) and Stichting Footprint: http://footprint.tudelft.nl/

    For a subscription: Bruil & Van de Staaij 

    +++

    The terrorist attacks at the start of the 21st century catapulted the issue of space and conflict into the forefront of architectural debates. As a result, existing and newly emerging national, religious and ethnic conflicts in relation to urban space became the focus of attention in architecture. Though military thinking had already had a long-standing tradition in architectural history, the sudden emergence of new spaces of conflict considerably altered architectural discourse. Extreme conditions of war, militarisation, climate change as well as economic crisis are threatening to structurally reconfigure our living environments. Over a decade later, however, the aftermath of these urban intrusions seems to have produced a diversified field of both thinking and action in architecture, as the theorising of spatial conflicts has started to incorporate a wide variety of reflections from other disciplines while architectural practices have shown a remarkable adequacy in addressing spaces of conflict, crisis and disaster. 

    The forthcoming 19th issue of Footprint will focus on these more recent roles of architecture in the contemporary spaces of conflict. In this issue, departing from a spatial understanding of geopolitical, climatological and economical conflicts, we seek to introduce and add to the professional discourse new conditions, spaces and experimental practices. Focusing on 'conflict', we are interested in contributions that highlight the large scale and phenomenal transitions in the physical world and in society by extrapolating, through examples, the abundance of relations that can be traced between conflict, territory and architecture.

    In addition to this focus on the spatial consequences of conflict, we would be interested in clarifying the intrinsic relationships that can be traced between theory and practice. Conflict areas often prove to be fertile grounds for innovation and for the emergence of new spatial forms. In their extremity, conflicts often serve as an intensified example for spatial processes that happen elsewhere, both in our cities, territories and landscapes. The ongoing condition of crisis has allowed for the emergence of all sorts of speculative scenarios, and simultaneously given rise to the emergence of new discursive takes on spaces of resilience.

    €25.00

  • Footprint 20 Analytic Philosophy and Architecture
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    v

    Footprint 20 Analytic Philosophy and Architecture

    +++Approaching Things from the Other Side | Vol 11/1 2017+++

    +++Karan August, Lara Schrijver (eds.)+++

     

    ISBN
    978-94-90322-84-7

    Graphic designer

    Meagan Kerr

    Production editors

    Andrej Radman, Nelson Mota

    Copy editor
    Heleen Schröder
    Amount of pages

    122

    Book size

    19 x 25.7 cm

    Binding

    Softcover 

    English

    Release date: Summer 2017

    Published in cooperation with Architecture Theory Chair (TU Delft) and Stichting Footprint: http://footprint.tudelft.nl/

    For a subscription: Bruil & Van de Staaij 

    +++

    This issue of Footprint explores the potential role of analytic philosophy in the context of architecture’s typical affinity with continental philosophy over the past three decades. In the last decades of the twentieth century, philosophy became an almost necessary springboard from which to define a work of architecture. Analytic philosophy took a notable backseat to continental philosophy. With this history in mind, this issue of Footprint sought to open the discussion on what might be offered by the less familiar branches of epistemology and logic that are more prevalent and developed in the analytic tradition.

    The papers brought together here are situated in the context of a discipline in transformation that seeks a fundamental approach to its own tools, logic and approaches. In this realm, the approaches of logic and epistemology help to define an alternate means of criticality not subjected to personalities or the specialist knowledge of individual philosophies. Rather the various articles attempt to demonstrate that such difference of background assumptions is a common human habit and that some of the techniques of analytic philosophy may help to leap these chasms. The hope is that this is a start of a larger conversation in architecture theory that has as of yet not begun.

    "Although thinkers in the field of architecture have embraced ideas emerging from philosophy through the works of continental philosophers since the late 1980s, references to analytic philosophy have remained distinctly absent within architecture history and theory. In part this may be attributable to a perception of analytic philosophy as historiophobic and politically conservative. However in recent decades the philosophical camp is readjusting its relation to language, and notably returning to questions of ethics. Might the finely detailed scholarship of thinkers such as Frege Wittgenstein, Carnap, and Quine, and the more recent scholarship of Jackson, Dummett, and Oswald Hanfling, offer method, style, and findings to the scrutiny of architectural thinkers? Might the emphasis on rule-based systems, clarity of argument and formal logic in the analytic tradition aid in understanding the conditions within which architecture is realized?

    Design processes in architecture and urbanism by their very nature have a strongly defined relation to the legislative and regulatory structures of urban master plans, and architectural and structural building codes. For example, in 2010 when asked how he could build such surreal spaces, architect Terunobu Fujimori replied that in Japan structures under ten square meters did not require building consent. Analytic philosophy in this case, may offer a perspective that grasps these particular interventions as experiments in expanding the role of the architect within a field constrained by rules and regulations. In this sense, Fujimori’s response becomes an example of finding alternate solutions for localized obstacles.

     In the constraint of the architect’s role, the expertise of the architect is commonly replaced by codes, regulations and guidelines, leading to question if a rule-based computer program can replace the architect? In academia we often play with understandings of architecture that defy the yielding position of our profession. To manifest the profound designs we must gain consent from governing bodies. The design processes of this mundane aspect of working within legislative confinements are undervalued and underdeveloped in academic discourse.

    In this Footprint, we suggest that the architecture debate may benefit from the less central traditions of analytic philosophy and of pragmatism, as they offer the means to address finite, localized, and tangible issues within architecture. We especially encourage contributions that approach issues of harnessing arguments within analytic philosophy to reinvigorate and re- appropriate roles of the architect as they navigate the ever increasing complexities of emerging in our field such as the digital augmentation of space, the ethical implications of new materials, the increasing independence of algorithms, the wealth of big data, and questions of the legal necessity to copyright one’s practice."

    With contributions by Karan Austust, Lara Schrijver, Tim Gough, Pauline Lefebvre, Borbála Jász, Andrea Alberto Dutto, Sean Pickersgill, Fabrio Bacchini, David Macarthur.

     

    €25.00

  • Footprint 21 Trans-Bodies / Queering Spaces
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    v

    Footprint 21 Trans-Bodies / Queering Spaces

    +++ +++

    +++Robert Gorny, Dirk van den Heuvel [eds.]+++

    ISBN

    978-94-90322-92-2

    Graphic design

    Meagan Kerr

    Number of pages

    130

    Book size

    19 x 25.7 cm

    Binding

    paperback

    Release date: Winter 2017

    English

    Copy editor: Heleen Schröder

    Published in cooperation with Architecture Theory Chair (TU Delft) and Stichting Footprint: http://footprint.tudelft.nl/ 

    For a subscription: Bruil & Van de Staaij 

    +++

    This issue of Footprint aims to introduce the latest developments in the field of queer theory into the realm of architecture and urban design – and vice versa, to make architectural and urban design concerns an element of queer studies. Next to uncovering hitherto hidden or repressed histories and practices as part of an agenda of inclusiveness, we consider an introduction of queer theory to architecture as engendering a radical reconceptualisation of the architectural discipline: That is, to upset and replace any conception of architecture as an embodiment of essentialist identities, forms or types, in order to move towards an understanding of architecture as a practice engaged in consistent transformation. Such a reconceptualisation of architecture views difference in terms of process, foregrounds liminal situations, their metamorphosis and transgression.

    Within queer theory one finds various contesting propositions regarding the very definition of ‘queer’ and acts of queering, especially now LGBTQI identities have become part of mainstream culture in western societies. Generally speaking, these propositions range from the mapping of queer identities – sometimes as another category in a taxonomy of essentialisms – to the idea of queering as performative acts of activist subversion and subjectivation. Such acts of queering resist the establishment of stable identities, while they promote transitory assemblages that are embedded within an unfolding process of differencing.

    A first concern is here the ‘logics’ in which these differences are produced and conceptualised, the concomitant disciplinary power structures and the epistemological frameworks that sustain these logics. The most radical variants of queering seek to undermine any bipolar, mutually exclusive opposition as in the case of heterosexist normativity and any other hegemonic discourse based on classic structuralist ‘twin-phenomena’ such as male-female, inside-outside, centre-periphery et cetera. Arguably, the recent coming-into-mainstream of transgender issues placed full attention on bodily transitioning processes themselves. In their fierce act of self-displacement, trans-bodies overcome dualist logics by exploring the transgressive dimensions involved in forms of becoming.

    Such tension between essentialism and becoming can already be observed in earlier attempts at connecting queer theory and architecture: in Queer Space (1997) Aaron Betsky proposed familiar gay tropes such as the closet and the interior, or hedonistic urban lifestyles as the ultimate spaces of queer identities, whereas Stud (1996) edited by Joel Sanders suggested a more complicated relationship between space and gay identities by clarifying that there is no ‘queer space’, only space put to queer use (Chauncey, in Sanders 1996, 224).

    Another vector of productive debate regarding this queering can be located between the discursive and the body, between language and matter. Judith Butler famously understands the formation of gendered identities, their enactments and possible undoing as performative. Alternatively, Rosi Braidotti’s feminist re-reading of Gilles Deleuze's concept of becoming starts with an emphasis on the conditioning, generating and accommodation of difference as belonging to situated material processes from one moment of actualisation to another. The difference that bodies make is here no longer seen as a formation ‘in’ space or ‘in’ an environment, but actualised as a figuration ‘of’ its material milieu (Barad, Bennett). A body (architecturally or otherwise) is understood as a transient and reciprocal form-taking of a milieu – unlike a singular entity contained by and acting in a neutral ‘space’ or ‘environment’. Such trans-bodies are not just in a state of transition themselves, they also trigger a transformation of the environment they traverse and populate, a queering of spaces indeed.

    With contributions by: Dirk van den Heuvel & Robert Alexander Gorny (eds.), Xenia Kokoula, Athina Angelopoulou, Tim Gough, Daniel Snyder, Andreas Angelidakis, Colin Ripley, Joel Sanders, and interview with Brady Burroughs, Katarina Bonnevier, Katja Grillner, and Hélène Frichot.

    €25.00